Rain jackets

You'll find army rain jackets and coats from here. We have many army surplus raincoats, but new products also. Rain jackets or raincoats are an easy approach. You don it like any jacket, but it's waterproof. Simple! Read the full story

ARMY RAIN JACKETS

You'll find army rain jackets and coats from here. We have many army surplus raincoats, but new products also. Rain jackets or raincoats are an easy approach. You don it like any jacket, but it's waterproof. Simple!

You can do anything wearing a military raincoat that you usually could, but physical activities, of course, increase sweating. Compared to an umbrella, a jacket is far better because it leaves your hands free and doesn't catch the wind - instead, it protects you from chilling gusts. So get yourself a rain protection with ability do activities with two hands!

With army surplus clothing in general, it's sometimes hard to have an impact on the sizing, but we are determined to inform you with the most accurate. With thin rain jackets, we suggest considering a little larger size because usually, you need some warmer layers of clothing under the jacket. Sure, you should familiarize the sizing info of each product because a large amount of military rain jackets are already designed to be a little loose. For example check Särmä TST Hardshell jacket. This jacket is designed to be the outermost layer on your clothing and its spacious because of that.

Some of the military surplus raincoats are warmer camo jackets that are protected with Gore-Tex or Sympatex foil making it waterproof. In its smallest forms, army rain jackets are very packable, so your ability to meet various conditions will be good with a coat. The downside is poor protection for the legs. Raincoats are considered a regular piece anyone should own, but quite often a waxed poly-cotton jacket or water-resistant softshell jacket would do just fine against random showers.

Should I get a vinyl jacket or waterproof and breathable?

Waterproof and so-called breathable membrane jackets do breathe better than rubber or vinyl, but you'll sweat in them anyways. Zippers in the armpits do wonders, and other common vent spots are the upper back and front area.

Non-breathable materials have superior waterproofing even under pressure (from shoulder straps), and they are more resilient to wear without requiring maintenance. We believe this approach is better for casual use, but trends seem to disagree with us.

P.S. You might want to check out our clothing system for more insight into remaining functional and comfortable in various weathers.

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