7d - For longer trips

For a long hike you should get quality gear. The worst case scenario is something breaking up in the middle. Moreover food, water and general preparation become a bigger issue. If you're leaving for a longer trip, you probably have spent a couple of nights outdoors before...Read the full story

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For a long hike you should get quality gear. The worst case scenario is something breaking up in the middle. Moreover food, water and general preparation become a bigger issue. If you're leaving for a longer trip, you probably have spent a couple of nights outdoors before.

On your feet

Well broken in footwear might be the most important thing. If it says "Mil-Tec", do not wear it here. Instead look for serious brands. We stock for example Jalas, Haix and Alpina, these are good. You choice of socks is equally important - wool is the best, maybe in two layers to minimize the chance of getting blisters. Consider a pair of tall gaiters too.

On you

By combining the right layers you can wear and pack a reasonably small garderobe with lots of flexibility. Your clothing should provide comfort, warmth and protection from wind and rain. You should be able to survive in the lowest possible temperature of the season. Pack a handful of socks and change them. A worthy multi-purpose item is the Särmä TST Thermal Cloak. Remember your head, neck and hands too.

On your back

You'll be hauling way more stuff than before, so get a proper tough rucksack that's also good to carry. We stock Berghaus, Savotta and Särmä TST lineups, these are all made for serious use. The budget choice is a used milsurp ruck, but test it well beforehand - although we will refund/replace faulty kit, the most unpleasant time for reclamation is in the wilderness.

In your bag

Thermal clothing and rainwear should have fast access spots, and the heaviest stuff should be against your back, while items that are not often needed can be stored lower down. Many rucksacks have a separate pocket in the back, these are pretty good for hydration packs. Don't forget a waterproof stuffsack or two. On longer trips a compass, maps and first aid kit are pretty relevant.

On camp

The basics you want in your camp are a place to lie down, a sleeping bag and protection from elements and possibly insects. The light option is a tarp, while a tent provides more protection. Learn to pitch your stuff before heading out! Every item should be thoroughly tested and made well. Consider a waterproof bivy bag for your sleeping bag.

If there's no real chance to restock food during the trip, the freeze-dried outdoor meals are good. Naturally hauling a week's worth of water by foot isn't feasible, so be prepared to purify it from natural sources. Boiling works, filters are faster. A gas stove is a handy companion, but if you have the option to make a campfire, do take it!

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